Additional Resources

Years of Service and Dedication

A couple of long-term, valued Sloan Lubrication Systems’ employees prepare to sail off into the sunset at the end of the year. We are really going to miss them and their tremendous contributions to the company.

Nancy Sloan, sister of our former company president, Walter Sloan, has been instrumental in a variety of critical roles through the years. Joining Nancy in retirement is Jim Krieg who is coming up on three decades of hard work building, installing, and servicing our systems.

We spoke with them about their memories and experience at Sloan Lubrication Systems and how they will spend their time after retirement. From grandbabies to classic car restoration, learn more about Nancy and Jim, their stories and their exciting plans ahead.

On behalf of the entire Sloan Lubrication Systems’ family, we wish Nancy and Jim continued success and thank them for their many years of representing the company.

NANCY SLOAN

How long have you been with the company?
I started working part-time in 2009, and traveled back and forth from my home in Sarasota, Florida, for a year before deciding to move back to my hometown of Oakmont and work for the company full-time.

Why did you want to work at Sloan Lubrication Systems?
I grew up watching the company grow. My dad used to help me with my algebra homework by asking me to calculate the volume of oil in a piece of ¼” tubing 10’ long, and then convert it to drips per second at various pressures. So when my brother Walter asked me to help with a project, I jumped at the chance to be a part of the family business, and to demonstrate that yes, women CAN be an integral part of an industrial business.

I knew that the company was expanding and growing and I was anxious to contribute my human resources, business, and organizational experience. And, it gave me the opportunity to move “home” at a time in my life when I was searching for just that.

What was your role?
In the beginning, my brother Walter asked me to help implement a new ERP system called Epicor (he didn’t remember that at one time in my career, I was a Vice President at Epicor Software in Southern California!). While working on that project, I pointed out other areas where I could contribute, primarily in Human Resources. We agreed that I would relocate and work full-time for the company. Then other tasks including Compliance were added to my role.

What do you feel you have contributed to the company?
One of the traits I picked up from my father was humility, which we also value at Sloan. I find it hard to “toot my own horn” sometimes, but I feel I made a significant contribution in bringing the Human Resources function up to date, organizing employee information, developing job descriptions and pay scales, policies and procedures, compliance tracking, and bringing in necessary training and risk management to the organization. I also feel that I contributed to the family values at Sloan, and helped to demonstrate that camaraderie builds great teams and that great working relationships contribute to overall company success.

Do you have a particular memory of an event while working at Sloan?
One summer, when work slowed down due to market conditions, we made the decision to keep employees productive by building a pig roaster. They designed, fabricated, welded, tested, and perfected a roaster using an old trailer chassis, a 50-gallon steel drum and spare parts. We celebrated the end of summer with a pig roast on the side lawn. That project had many lasting benefits besides supporting a delicious outdoor event now and then; and Brian and CJ earned kudos for showing up at 4:00 am to put the pig on the spit!

What will you miss the most about Sloan once you retire?
I will miss the busy-ness, the camaraderie of the entire Sloan team, the ability to continue contributing to the growth of the company, and being a part of a great story.

What in your mind is unique or special about Sloan?
So many things are unique about the company. In my time at Sloan, we never let anyone go for lack of work, and we did everything we could to tweak budgets and plans to weather some rough spots. I learned that our practice of giving all employees the opportunity to earn bonuses every quarter was a rare benefit that few companies offer. We talk about Sloan being a family business, and it is – for almost 100 years. But there’s more to it than the name; it’s treating employees to a pig roast or a pizza Friday every now and then, or having the company leaders make pancakes for a company breakfast, or thanking employees with a gift and an extra bonus for their contributions during the challenges of COVID. Happy employees make great products, great products make customers happy, and happy customers spread the word to others. Everyone wins.

What are you going to do when you retire?
Spend as much time as I can with family; I have daughters in Connecticut and Florida, four grandchildren, and a brother and sister in Florida. I will enjoy the journeys to visit them, and the leisure time to enjoy them all.

JAMES KRIEG

How long have you been with the company?
I was hired in 1991, so it is coming up on 30 years with the company.

Why did you want to work at Sloan Lubrication Systems?
At the time, I was currently laid off from Volkswagen. I knew Walter Sloan from coaching his son in soccer, so I asked him if they needed any help. He said yes, and the rest is history.

What was your role?
I started off in the shop building blocks and panels, and slowly started to help with installs. Currently, I am working in the production room, as well as advising on road install jobs.

What do you feel you have contributed to the company?
I feel that I have contributed at Sloan Lubrication Systems by always wanting to make things right the first time and not cut corners. That is what has made Sloan so successful… taking care of the customers.

Do you have a particular memory of an event while working at Sloan?
One of the memories I have from working at Sloan Lubrication System is our lunch time boat rides. When we worked in Oakmont, we did a few special projects that I remember, as well as many little things for Walter at his house and with the business.

What will you miss the most about Sloan once you retire?
The thing that I will miss the most when I retire is the friendships and the relaxed attitude that came from working at Sloan.

What in your mind is unique or special about Sloan?
The biggest thing that was unique about Sloan was the family atmosphere, and the freedom to do our work with minimal oversight. They trusted us to do the jobs to the best of our abilities.

What are you going to do when you retire?
I have two houses that need work done on them, and a garage with a few projects in it. I have a classical car and a few others that I am working on. I have 29 years of unfinished projects to complete.

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